Working papers

Contents


Ten Years in Tamil Nadu: Exploring Labour, Migration and Debt from Longitudinal Household Surveys in South India

—M. Di Santolo, I. Guérin, S. Michiels, C. Mouchel, A. Natal, C. J. Nordman, G. Venkatasubramanian

DIAL Working Paper No. DT/2024-02, (2024).
Read more »

Indian society has been experiencing significant changes since the nineties brought by a gradual set of reforms in favour of a market economy and the country’s integration into the global economy. However, despite outstanding economic growth for the last decades, India continues to be gripped by strong inequalities and the burden of social institutions such as caste, family or gender. Regarding the time pace of such changes, longitudinal studies appear to be particularly useful and revealing in analysing the extent of socio-economic dynamics. This paper aims to propose a new longitudinal data collection tool and a broad picture of socio-economic dynamics in rural areas of Tamil Nadu for the last decade. Data have been collected using the NEEMSIS survey. It is focused on more than 600 households from 10 villages in Tamil Nadu at three points in time; 2010, 2016-17 and 2020-21. The NEEMSIS survey encompass key topics including employment, indebtedness, agriculture, wealth, formation of skills, social networks, or social and spatial mobilities.

Cite as:
Di Santolo, M., Guérin, I., Michiels, S., Mouchel, C., Natal, A., Nordman, C. J., & Venkatasubramanian, G. (2024). Ten Years in Tamil Nadu: Exploring Labour, Migration and Debt from Longitudinal Household Surveys in South India (Working Paper No. DT/2024-02). DIAL. Paris, France.


The Determinants of Trust: Evidence from Rural South India

—A. Hilger, C. J. Nordman.

IZA Discussion Paper No. 13150, (2020).
Read more »

Trust and participation in social networks are inherently interrelated. We make use of India’s demonetization policy, an unexpected and unforeseeable exogenous variation, to causally identify the effect of social networks in determining trust. We use first-hand quantitative and qualitative data from rural South India and control for individual characteristics (personality traits, cognitive ability) that could influence network formation and trust, finding that social interactions have a significant effect on trust among men, as well as across castes. Among lower castes, who live in homogeneous neighborhoods and relied on neighbors and employers to cope, extending one’s network lowers trust in neighbors. Among middle castes, who live in more heterogeneous neighborhoods and relied predominantly on other caste members, a larger network size leads to greater trust placed in kin among employees but lesser in neighbors. This paper thus shows that social interactions can foster trust and highlights the importance of clearly defining in- and out-groups in trust measures within highly segregated societies.

Cite as:
Hilger, A., & Nordman, C. J. (2020). The Determinants of Trust: Evidence from Rural South India (Working Paper No. 13150). IZA. Bonn, Germany.

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search